Rare World War II Propaganda Posters | Time.com

Though some wartime propaganda art has since become iconic, plenty of posters from the World War II era are rare, with few original examples having survived through the decades. World War II Posters, a new book, brings to light some of those artifacts. The book features highlights from the more than 10,000 posters collected over…

via See the Rare Propaganda Posters of World War II — TIME

Quote on Editing the Work of [Other] Writers by Robert Silvers of The New York Review of Books, an industry legacy and a great man, who passed away today at age 87.

The New York Review of Books Obituary 

I believe in the writer—the writer, above all. That’s how we started off: admiring the writer. We organized the New York Review according to the writers we admired most: Edmund Wilson, Wystan Auden, Fred Dupee, Norman, Bill, Lizzie, Mary among them. Each of them had a confident sense of their own prose, and it meant a great deal to them—the matter of a comma, a semicolon, a word—and it does to our writers today. And so, when it comes to making a change, we should not do it without their permission. If a moment comes at some point where we see something should be improved, we don’t just scribble it in but call them up wherever they are. And that is, I think, crucial.

                                         —Robert Silvers

Robert Silvers, co-founding editor of The New York Review of Books , died today, March 20, 2017, after an illness. He was 87 years old.

The dazzling musicality of Derek Walcott, recipient of a Nobel Prize in Poetry, who passed away on Friday, March 17,2017 | Vox.com

Nobel Laureate Poet Derek Walcott has died this Friday at 87 years old. Walcott’s poetry centered around his life in St. Lucia in the Caribbean, and with the complex colonialist legacy that created his world — but it contains multitudes, and it travels around the world as much as its voraciously erudite author did. By turns epic and compact, Walcott’s poetry has a dazzling musicality and lyricism. It begs to be read aloud; you can almost taste the words as you read them.

To celebrate his legacy, here is a stanza from In the Village, a poem about Walcott’s time in New York’s Greenwich Village:

Who has removed the typewriter from my desk,

so that I am a musician without his piano

with emptiness ahead as clear and grotesque

as another spring? My veins bud, and I am so

full of poems, a wastebasket of black wire.

The notes outside are visible; sparrows will

line antennae like staves, the way springs were,

but the roofs are cold and the great grey river

where a liner glides, huge as a winter hill,

moves imperceptibly like the accumulating

years. I have no reason to forgive her

for what I brought on myself. I am past hating,

past the longing for Italy where blowing snow

absolves and whitens a kneeling mountain range

outside Milan. Through glass, I am waiting

for the sound of a bird to unhinge the beginning

of spring, but my hands, my work, feel strange

without the rusty music of my machine. No words

for the Arctic liner moving down the Hudson, for the mange

of old snow moulting from the roofs. No poems. No birds. 

It’s a quiet, melancholy poem built around the idea of being unable to create poems, and it moves so naturally and swiftly that it might take a few readings to catch its tricky, irregular rhyme scheme (I make it ABABCDEEDFEFBGFHGIGI) and the subliminal musicality it creates.

Thank you for everything, Derek Walcott. You were so / full of poems.

http://www.vox.com/culture/2017/3/17/14959438/derek-walcott-obituary-in-the-village

Related Story:  Derek Walcott In The New Yorker 

Fun Facts About Birthstones [INFOGRAPHIC]

Most people know what their birthstone is without a second thought, but how much do we really know about the actual gemstones themselves? The gems designated as birthstones have been around for tho…

Source: Fun Facts About Birthstones [INFOGRAPHIC]

5 DIY Jewelry Organization Projects to Try at Home

Necklaces in a tangle? Bracelets piled on on your dresser? Rings scattered across your home, devoid of logic or order? These DIY projects could be the fix you need to finally organize your jewelry …

Source: 5 DIY Jewelry Organization Projects to Try at Home

John Oliver is Running Cable Network Ads to School Trump on Basic Facts Presidents Should Know | Quartz.com

The Bowling Green massacre. The inauguration turnout. The voter fraud that cost him the popular vote. Donald Trump lives in an alternative universe with alternative facts, but John Oliver isn’t having any of it. After a three-month hiatus, his show Last Week Tonight With John Oliver returned to HBO Sunday (Feb. 12) with biting commentary…

via John Oliver is running ads on cable networks to school Trump on basic facts presidents should know — Quartz

Janet Mock’s tribute to transgender women of color and sex workers is a lesson for all women about intersectionality

Of the many compelling keynote speakers at the Women’s March on Washington on Saturday, transgender activist and author Janet Mock delivered a striking tribute to transgender women of color and sex workers. Her words on sex workers in particular echoed similar points she made in a Tumblr post published earlier this week, which explained why it was so important to include sex workers’ rights in the official Women’s March policy platform.

At the march, she focused on intersectionality. “I stand here today most of all because I am my sister’s keeper,” she said. Read on for her full speech below.

janet-mock-womens-march-1-21-17

So we are here. We are here not merely to gather but to move, right? And our movements, our movements require us to do more than just show up and say the right words. It requires us to break out of our comfort zones and be confrontational. It requires us to defend one another when it is difficult and dangerous. It requires us to truly see ourselves and one another

I stand here today as the daughter of a native Hawaiian woman and a black veteran from Texas. I stand here as the first person in my family to go to college. I stand here as someone who has written herself onto this stage to unapologetically proclaim that I am a trans woman-writer-activist-revolutionary of color. And I stand here today because of the work of my forebears, from Sojourner to Sylvia, from Ella to Audre, from Harriet to Marsha.

I stand here today most of all because I am my sister’s keeper. My sisters and siblings are being beaten and brutalized, neglected and invisibilizied, extinguished and exiled. My sisters and siblings have been pushed out of hostel homes and intolerant schools. My sisters and siblings have been forced into detention facilities and prisons and deeper into poverty. And I hold these harsh truths close. They enrage me and fuel me. But I cannot survive on righteous anger alone. Today, by being here, it is my commitment to getting us free that keeps me marching.

Our approach to freedom need not be identical but it must be intersectional and inclusive. It must extend beyond ourselves. I know with surpassing certainty that my liberation is directly linked to the liberation of the undocumented trans Latina yearning for refuge. The disabled student seeking unequivocal access. The sex worker fighting to make her living safely.

Collective liberation and solidarity is difficult work, it is work that will find us struggling together and struggling with one another. Just because we are oppressed does not mean that we do not ourselves fall victim to enacting the same unconscious policing, shaming, and erasing. We must return to one another with greater accountability and commitment to the work today.

By being here you are making a commitment to this work. Together we are creating a resounding statement, a statement that stakes a claim on our lives and our loves, our bodies and our babies, our identities and our ideals. But a movement – a movement is so much more than a march. A movement is that difficult space between our reality and our vision. Our liberation depends on all of us, all of us returning to our homes and using this experience and all the experiences that have shaped us to act, to organize, to resist. Thank you.

January 27 International Holocaust Remembrance Day

The United Nations General Assembly designated January 27—the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau—as International Holocaust Remembrance Day. On this annual day of commemoration, the UN urges every member state to honor the victims of the Nazi era and to develop educational programs to help prevent future genocides.

Join the conversation and share your reflections about International Holocaust Remembrance Day on social media using #HolocaustRemembrance.

AT THE MUSEUM

WASHINGTON, DC

On January 27 at 11 a.m. EST, the Museum will host a commemoration of International Holocaust Remembrance Day. This program will feature remarks from the Honorable Björn Lyrvall, ambassador of Sweden to the United States, and a Holocaust survivor, musical selections with the US Army Band, as well as a candle-lighting ceremony and victims’ names reading.

 Join live at ushmm.org/watch.

AROUND THE WORLD

UNITED NATIONS, NEW YORK CITY

Through March 5, the United Nations is hosting State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda. This powerful exhibition examines how the Nazis used propaganda to win broad voter support, implement radical programs, and justify war and mass murder. It emphasizes why the issue of propaganda matters and challenges citizens to actively question, analyze, and seek the truth. 

Additionally, UN Information Centers in more than 40 countries will host condensed exhibitions in nine languages featuring State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda.

WORLD WAR II MUSEUM, NEW ORLEANS

The National World War II Museum is hosting State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda. It opens with a special event on January 26 held in conjunction with International Holocaust Remembrance Day that features reflections from a Holocaust survivor and a Museum educator. Visit the exhibition through June 18.

CITY HALL, PARIS

Paris’s Hȏtel de Ville, or city hall, will host State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda (L’État Trompeur: Le Pouvoir de la Propagande Nazi). Visit the exhibition in the Paris Rendez-Vous space from January 26 through February 27.

MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY, DALLAS, PENNSYLVANIA

Misericordia University is hosting Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race, an exhibition that explores the history of the early 20th century international eugenics movement and the complicity of physicians and scientists in Nazi racial policies. It is partnering with the Maimonides Institute for Medicine, Ethics and the Holocaust to present two special events on January 26 and 27 in conjunction with International Holocaust Remembrance Day, featuring Museum historian Patricia Heberer Rice. The exhibition will be on display through March 14, 2017.

CONFRONTING PROPAGANDA

Learning about the Nazi use of propaganda advances our understanding of how and why the Holocaust happened and helps us identify relevant lessons today. In this brief clip, Holocaust survivor Bob Behr recounts his personal experience growing up in Berlin where he faced the power and pain of Nazi propaganda.

The aims of life are the best defense against death.     Primo Levi

On January 27, 1945, Soviet troops liberated Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest Nazi concentration camp. Italian chemist and writer Primo Levi was among those freed. The author of several books, novels, short story collections, and poems, Levi is best-known for If This Is a Man (aka Survival in Auschwitz), his account of the year he spent in the death camp, and his memoir told through the metaphor of chemistry, The Periodic Table. 

     

Roxane Gay reads and discusses Difficult Women with Saeed Jones of BuzzFeed at 92Y [12JAN17]

“Everything caters to the male gaze and I just, I’m not interested in that as a writer, and so, I want to write stories where women are centered, even if their stories exist, in part, because of something that has happened with a man.”

Roxane Gay

I have a deep, abiding love and respect for Roxane Gay. I would follow her to Reno without hesitation, asking only one (wholly important) question, “lipstick or boots?” 

 I see her. And I know that she sees me.
92Y | Roxane Gay | Difficult Women  

​Live and Life Will Give You Pictures: Masterworks of French Photography, 1890–1950​ | exhibition open through January 9, 2017, Roberts Gallery at The Barnes Museum, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Photography was invented in France in the 1820s, and many of its most innovative and influential practitioners developed in the milieu that produced the impressionist, post-impressionist, and early modern artists favored by Albert C. Barnes and featured in the collection of the Barnes Foundation.

October 8, 2016–January 9, 2017
Roberts Gallery

In the second half of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th, photographers and painters traded aesthetic ideas and were interested in many of the same features of contemporary experience, particularly as it touched Paris. Sometimes referred to as the “capital of modernity,” the city was radically transformed in this period of rapid industrialization, urbanization, and class stratification. As with the other visual arts, progressive photography came to be defined by the novel ways in which it was able to represent the more spectacular aspects of these and related developments that shaped all modern cities.

To illustrate these phenomena, this exhibition, titled after a remark by Henri Cartier-Bresson, presents vintage prints of nearly 200 classic images made between 1890 and 1950 by French photographers and photographers working extensively in France. The salon-style hang will be organized thematically. Subjects include Paris and Environs, Life on the Street, Labor and Leisure, Commerce, Personality and Publicity, Reportage, and Art for Art’s Sake.

Drawn exclusively from the private collection of Michael Mattis and Judy Hochberg, Live and Life Will Give You Pictures resonates with the core of the Barnes collection and includes work by such masters as Berenice Abbott, Eugène Atget, Ilse Bing, Erwin Blumenfeld, Brassaï, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Edgar Degas, Eugène Druet, André Kertész, Francois Kollar, Jacques-Henri Lartigue, Dora Maar, Man Ray, Lisette Model, László Moholy-Nagy, and Félix Thiollier.

Live and Life Will Give You Pictures was organized by the Barnes Foundation in conjunction with Art2Art Circulating Exhibitions.