Book Review | The Lost History of Stars by Dave Boling

From a forgotten moment in history comes an inspiring novel about finding strength and courage in the most unimaginable places.

In turn-of-the-century South Africa, fourteen-year-old Lettie, her younger brother, and her mother are Dutch Afrikaner settlers who have been taken from their farm by British soldiers and are being held in a concentration camp. It is early in the Boer War, and Lettie’s father, grandfather, and brother are off fighting the British as thousands of Afrikaner women and children are detained. The camps are cramped and disease ridden; the threat of illness and starvation are ever present. Determined to dictate their own fate, Lettie and her family give each other strength and hope as they fight to survive amid increasingly dire conditions.

Brave and defiant, Lettie finds comfort in memories of stargazing with her grandfather, her plan to be a writer, and surprising new friendships that will both nourish and challenge her. A beautiful testament to love, family, and sheer force of will, The Lost History of Stars was inspired by Dave Boling’s grandfather’s own experience as a soldier during the Boer War. Lettie is a figure of abiding grace, and her story is richly drawn and impossible to forget.

Link to an Excerpt (pdf) of The Lost History of Stars

Link to Author’s essay (pdf) A Young Girl in a Forgotten War which reveals

  •  why he was drawn to the Boers War

One of the original impetuses for The Lost History of Stars was that my grandfather had been some manner of camp guard in the British Army during the Boer War. I realized after just a little bit of research that this war has been largely forgotten by most of the world, even though it was a blueprint for the warfare and cruelty to come later in the twentieth century.  With the Boer men and boys (ages eight to eighty) in commandos out on the veld, the British burned the Boer farms and forced the displaced women and children into hastily constructed concentration camps. In the face of terrible sanitation, overcrowding, and lack of food and medical services, twenty-seven thousand women and children died in the camps, a total nearly ten times greater than the number of deaths of soldiers in combat on both sides. It was, truly, a war against children.

  • the process that lead him to integrate fact-based research with Aletta’s personality to deftly narrate the novel in her voice, relating what she experienced and survived her imprisonment

At that point, I surrendered the narration of the book to the character who could breathe life into it: an adolescent girl named Aletta Venter. Over time, that’s left too few opportunities to celebrate the small, hard-won individual victories of brave characters like Aletta Venter.

  • how Aletta morphed into his heroine

Aging from twelve to fourteen in the book, Aletta has the audacity to believe she can carve out bits of normalcy while imprisoned in a British concentration camp in South Africa during the Anglo-Boer War (1899–1902). She grows, adapts, and takes joy in her small daily insurgencies. When facing a lack of paper for her journal, she steals every copy of the posted camp rules she can find. Because, as she reasons, among the many rules imposed by the Brits, none forbids the stealing of the rules. To Aletta, imprisonment is a state of mind, so she wages her tiny war against the British Empire with her only weapons: hope and imagination.

 The Lost History of Stars
Author: Dave Boling | Publisher: Algonquin Books | List Price: $25.95
Hardcover: ISBN 978-1-61620-417-4 | Sale Date 7 June 2017 | Pages 352
Purchase at  Amazon   IndieBound   Powell’s
Ebook: ISBN 978-1-61620-714-4 | Sale Date 11 July 2017
Purchase at  Amazon Kindle   Kobo

Meet the Author
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Born and raised in South Chicago, Dave Boling now lives and works as a sports columnist in the Seattle, Washington area. His first novel, Guernica, an extraordinary historical tale of love, family and war set in the Basque town of Guernica before, during, and after its destruction by the German Luftwaffe during the Spanish Civil War, became an international bestseller and has been translated into 13 languages. Prior to journalism, Boling played football at the University of Louisville and worked as an ironworker in Chicago, a logger in the Pacific Northwest, a bartender, a bouncer, and a laborer in a car factory and steel mills. Boling began writing fiction at age 53.


Algonquin Books |Books For A Well-Read Life

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